What are some examples of GOAT detail writing?

From Aaron Reed’s book about Inform 7:
“Details Are Adrenaline, Generalities Are Novocain
I stole this one from theater professor Greg Fritsch, but it works equally well for any form of storytelling, especially interactive ones.Your job is to make your story world so alive the players can picture being there, and believe the story will react when they type a command.
Think of specific objects that provide color and texture to a scene, and the particular qual-ities that make them unique. Use senses other than vision to paint a multisensory scene:
what does this place sound like? Feel like? Smell like? Avoid chiché by finding unique ways to describe the scene in your mind’s eye, delving deeper than the surface: if it’s a dark and stormy night, how dark and what kind of stormy? What does the storm do to the grass, and how does the dark taste?”.
What are some detailed depictions that you consider the greatest of all time, in regular & interactive fiction?

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Shore of An Underground Lake

A narrow ledge of solid rock at the southern end of a great cavern. Beyond it lies a body of water so flat, so black and tranquil, that it might be a surface of polished obsidian.

A loose rock lies near your foot.

Embedded in the wall, a mirror reflects your movements: an odd smoothness in the unshaped stone.

A heavy bronze bell hangs from a stand.

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Idk if this counts as the greatest of all time, but the most recent IF descriptions that struck me were from After the Accident by @AmandaB

These are the opening words of the game:

The sunset warms your face, impossible pink fading to lavender, gold fire touching the place where the road meets the sky, running in rivulets onto the pavement. The road awash in orange light. Something terrible behind you, you think. An ending before you, the day dropping away, the first stars above. The mountains rising to your left, covered in snow, reflecting the last light, an avalanche waiting to happen. The stark plains to your right, gilded with the low rays of sun.

Your hands tingle, a soft pain that sharpens when you acknowledge it. Your bare feet are cold. You breathe deep and it aches. It’s so beautiful, it aches, your face wet.

Something strange, though, that you are here

(why are you here your feet bare your face wet your hands tingling)

with all these colors of light layering softly into the road, the bare dirt, the scrub grass, the trash on the side of the road. You were somewhere else a moment ago, with him, and he’s not here, but you are, glittering in the last sunlight as a memory whispers in your ear and strokes your cheek.

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The whole of Eat Me by Chandler Groover. It’s so terrifying, the stuff you’ve been made to do, but such perfect writing. All of the courses is what you’re looking for.

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To me, the goat is what Charlie Brown wants to avoid being when he plays baseball, in Peanuts.

-Wade

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What is “GOAT detail writing”?

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Greatest
Of
All
Time

EDIT: As opposed to “BOAT”…
Buoyant
Of
All
Time

(Sorry that was an attempt at humor… and I am succeeding!)

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Are you serious, or just pulling my leg?

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The “GOAT” acronym is 100% serious. A linguistic gift from my age bracket. (Slang is weird…)

EDIT: Slang continues to elude me! I incorrectly attributed its origin!

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My friend that’s a gift from Muhammad Ali :slight_smile:

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Is it??? Hell, then it’s had a resurgence! My mistake! :sweat_smile: Thanks, Mr. Ali!

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Thanks. I Googled it and you’re right. I’d never heard of it before. You learn something every day, huh?

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Learning new slang from Australia and the UK is a tonne of adventure, too! :grin:

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A post was split to a new topic: So as not to derail with puns

gosh I can’t believe I forgot about Eat Me. perfect, delicious example.

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This is a truly delightful bit of writing from Christopher Merriner that transports me directly to the Suffolk countryside:
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Douglas Adams: paraphrasing in case I don’t remember the exact wording:

“The ship hung in the sky in the exact way that bricks don’t.”

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That line always makes me laugh. Douglas Adams was a master writer.

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Agreed. He was also a master procrastinator. He liked being a writer, but the parts involving actually writing were always an awful pain for him. Hold on, @SomeOne2 . There is a truly delightful (and absurdly long) essay on the development hell of one specific Infocom game that really shines a light on Adams, good, bad, and indifferent. Given your affinity for HHGttG and Milliways, I’m guessing you would greatly appreciate it if you haven’t read it already. Hold on, let me track it down…

FOUND IT!!!

https://www.filfre.net/2015/08/bureaucracy/

If you do decide to read through the article, please make sure to read through the comments too. Some of the people who were physically there for it back in the day actually commented and had some interesting things to add.

Oh, bummer, no preview box? Huh… Well, I’ll add a picture, because the naked link is underwhelming.

There, that’s better. Fake preview box.

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Oh yeah, I read this one! Reading through it again, I’m quite sad because personally I’m really fond of Bureaucracy, being in my Top 20. But I know lots don’t like it much.

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