The Empty Chamber review

springthing
#1

I was seriously disappointed with this game; it was over far to quickly!

Already from the opening introduction I was feeling very hopeful, anticipating some properly stimulating problem solving. Typing the recommended help command only served to intrigue me further:

The intriguing output of the help command (not really a spoiler)

This is a story set inside one room, which you can regard by typing look (or simply l). There’s no need to move around, but there are plenty of things to examine (x), to touch, and even to smell, and various fixtures to open or close. You won’t find any items to pick up - this is a crime scene, after all - but Celia always carries her lockpick, just in case she needs to unlock something.
Typing map (m) will show you the room layout, while deduce will trigger the ending sequence - note that you can do this at any time. You may also want to ask land about relevant topics, such as the victim, or Celia herself.

I really enjoy one-room puzzlefests, and this was almost one of the better ones, had it only been longer. The protagonist is cool (and played in third, not second, person!) and while the two side characters are stereotypes, they work really well in this setting. Speaking of the setting, it’s lovely too, though limited by the constraints of the game.

After about one hour of fun, intensively looking for clues and connecting dots, I was feeling properly stuck. I decided then to try the deduce command, which triggers the ending, and discovered that I had, well, discovered everything and solved the game. I hadn’t even found the bullet (I assume it went out the window, but couldn’t see where it ended up), let alone understood why Hackett decided to end his life.

I really hope we’ll see a longer version of this game, or more parser IF from the author!

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