Inklewriter Cloak of Darkness

rather than ask a million questions of how to do a,b,c,etc, can anyone point me to the source of cloak of darkness in inklewriter?

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I wasn’t sure whether you mean specifically inklewriter, which is an authoring tool originally created by inkle studio, or ink the language, which was also created by inkle, but is not identical to inklewriter.

I don’t know whether there is a version of “Cloak of Darkness” for inklewriter (the tool); but the built-in tutorial is not very long and covers what’s necessary, I think.

Here are some versions of “Cloak of Darkness” in ink (the language):

Also, the source of “The Intercept” could be helpful: the-intercept/TheIntercept.ink at master · inkle/the-intercept · GitHub

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Thanks, I know that Ink can do it, I am specifically trying to find it in Inklewriter. That source alone, would be my manual for how to do, what I need to do. Not quickly finding one on google, suggests it is a difficult assignment (as there should be many).

Ah, I see.

You could take a look at how other inklewriter stories are implemented by opening their URL and appending “.json” to it, which will let you see the inklewriter source of the story in JSON format.

You can then download or copy it, and later get it into inklewriter again by logging in, using the “import” option on the menu bar, pasting the JSON data, and importing and opening the story, which you can then analyse and edit within the inklewriter editor.

Examples:
https://oldinklewriter.inklestudios.com/stories/musgraveritual.json

https://oldinklewriter.inklestudios.com/stories/theintercept.json

https://oldinklewriter.inklestudios.com/stories/mv4f.json

This should work for any of the stories in the list on the bottom of this page.

I haven’t looked at these in detail, but I’m sure there should be some which contain the necessary elements to recreate Cloak of Darkness. For example, “The Musgrave Ritual” uses some markers, counters and conditionals to implement state-tracking.

thanks, Ill try to create my own. I always start with that for each “tool” I try.