Review: Necron's Keep

I’ve decided to do a Rovarsson with my latest review and post it here as well as on ifdb. I think there are folks around who’d like the parser-CRPG Necron’s Keep if they knew about it, and I can’t tell, these days, how many parser game players are following new reviews on IFDB.

I remember when Necron’s Keep first appeared via IFDB back in 2011, totally unheralded. It got one bad review and some comments, and that was the last commentary about it in public. But it appears the author was revising it as recently as 2019 to a version 5.

I found my way back to it because I just came off a Bard’s Tale I jaunt in the remastered version on Steam, and presumably had old-school fighting RPGs on the brain. Necron’s still has bugs but it’s come a mile, and I was able to complete it. I’m tempted to write a quick guide, probably driven by my ego in being the first person to complete the game whom I’ve been able to detect using my human powers.

The review:

"Version five of Necron’s Keep is a great advance on the buggy original I tried many years ago. I played this hardcore CRPG to completion over four hours and found it to be very entertaining, in spite of the continued presence of many bugs of inconvenience (mostly involving the automatic inventory management). In a nutshell, Necron’s Keep is a challenging, detailed and unforgiving single-character fantasy CRPG. There’s no UNDO, and you’ll need to keep and label many a save file to make it through. What you get in return is an interesting spellcasting system, transparent die-rolled combat and a satisfying gaming challenge with plenty of danger. The story style is probably most like that of a 1980s Fighting Fantasy gamebook, complete with nasty surprises, while the combat adds some AD&D-like detail.

You wouldn’t expect someone called Necron to be a nice guy, but the truth of this game’s background story is that you don’t know. He’s an archmage who went off to live with his people in an enchanted castle and fell out of contact with the world. The king has sent you, a mage, to Necron’s place to find out what’s going on.

In the fashion of many an old-school (or old-school-styled) RPG, the beginning of this game can be the roughest time. It’s when random die rolls and traps can kill you off quickly. Traps and monsters will eat your hp (there are both fixed and random encounters), and the spells you cast to try to protect yourself also cost hp. The multi-page tome you’re given to read at the game’s start is semi-overwhelming, but it combines lore on how the spell system works with hints that will help you later in the game. You start off with a good number of spells; they show up in your inventory. More spells can be learned from scrolls you find (doing that also costs hp!) and some require material components that you need to find on your journey. This is quite a cool aspect of the game, though it takes a lot of observation to work out which components get eaten by the casting of spells. In bad but amusing news, the game is prepared to incinerate your only held wooden weapon to cast a spell requiring wood if you don’t have any other wood in your inventory. You can detect traps, mend broken items, divine the nature of things, cast offensive spells in combat. There’s a good range of stuff and a lot of it works on a lot of the game’s contents.

The thing that might drive some players spare is the inventory. You’ve got an unlimited holdall, but only finite hand space. So the game autoswaps items in and out of your holdall as required. This constantly results in situations like you putting away one of two things you need simultaneously when you take the first one out, or accidentally forgetting to get the wood out and burning your weapon as a spell component. This is the main site of bugs in the game that still needs fixing.

The early game is about battling through and finding healing items to sustain you. Once you have the power to create your own healing sphere (this is a cool effect, where you ENTER SPHERE, then sleep or meditate to recover), you enter the midgame, roaming around fighting monsters, collecting xp, healing, learning new spells. The late game could be considered tackling the bigger puzzles and challenges of the keep directly. I was stuck for ages in the midgame because one room exit wasn’t mentioned, but I’m not sure if this was semi-intentional – there’s a magic item you can acquire that gives you an exit lister, and it was the exit lister that showed me the new way to go.

Once you’ve worked everything out in Necron’s Keep, there’s a degree of optimisation in stringing all your knowledge together, and probably revisiting older saves where you were in a better position. I felt really satisfied when I completed it.

This is definitely one for people who like this kind of game, and in spite of its inconveniences, I think it’s a good example of the CRPG in parser game form. I wouldn’t normally give a game with this many bugs remaining a four, but I can’t go below four for a game that kept me this involved."

Necron’s Keep page on IFDB: https://ifdb.org/viewgame?id=w8c5ngckvclnjum1

-Wade

6 Likes