Opposite of Instead of looking command

I am using the Instead of looking command after declaring a room with objects inside the room.

The problem is the code is running but the story only shows the Instead of looking outputs and not the room with its object’s outputs.

If I use [] around the Instead of looking command block then the room and its objects shows up in the story.

My thinking is that the Instead of looking command disable the room declaration with its objects as they are all lookable objects.

Is there a way to get these two, instead of looking and room declaration, to work together and see both outcomes in the story?

Is there possibly an opposite command to start the looking feature again?

I’m not sure if my description is correct for my problem.

I’m using Inform 7 build 6M62

Thanks in advance

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That is very unlikely and I guess it something quite simple like a missing dot or square brackets in the wrong place. Can you post that piece of code?

Inside-EO is a room. The Planning table is in the Inside-EO. A man called Logistics Section Chief is in the Inside-EO. A man called Finance Section Chief is in the Inside-EO. A man called Information Section Chief is in the Inside-EO. A man called Media Coordenator is in the Inside-EO. A man called Media Liaison Officer is in the Inside-EO.

In the Inside-EO is a man called the boss. The indefinite article of the boss is “Planning Section”.

The description of the Planning table is “A large square table”.

Feature is a kind of value. The features are intelligent, well-build, stricked, educated, loyal, self-controled, devoted and sincere.

Appearance relates various persons to various features. The verb to appear means the appearance relation.

Logistics Section Chief appears educated and loyal.

Finance Section Chief appears educated and loyal.

Information Section Chief appears intelligent and devoted.

Media Coordenator appears loyal and educated.

Media Liaison Officer appears stricked and sincere and well-build and educated.

Yourself appears intelligent and loyal and devoted and educated.

Instead of looking:
say “The intelligent ones: [list of people who appear intelligent][line break]”;
say “The well-build ones: [list of people who appear well-build][line break]”;
say “The stricked ones: [list of people who appear stricked][line break]”;
say “The educated ones: [list of people who appear educated][line break]”;
say “The loyal ones: [list of people who appear loyal][line break]”;
say “The self-controled ones: [list of people who appear self-controled][line break]”;
say “The devoted ones: [list of people who appear devoted][line break]”;
say “The sincere ones: [list of people who appear sincere][line break]”.

Instead of asking:
	say “The intelligent ones: [list of people who appear intelligent][line break]”;
	say “The well-build ones: [list of people who appear well-build][line break]”;
	say “The stricked ones: [list of people who appear stricked][line break]”;
	say “The educated ones: [list of people who appear educated][line break]”;
	say “The loyal ones: [list of people who appear loyal][line break]”;
	say “The self-controled ones: [list of people who appear self-controled][line break]”;
	say “The devoted ones: [list of people who appear devoted][line break]”;
	say “The sincere ones: [list of people who appear sincere][line break]”.

The Say phrases need to be indented with a tab, I assume that’s the bug.

Yes, it is but with the copy and paste it shifted. In my actual code is indent

That part is the only one that shows up in the story when running it, although I can still look at the table but the player will not know it is there as the first part of the code does not show before the latter part of code.

Well, I guess you are right: The instead of looking is overwriting the standard room description. Depending on what you need you could do something like:

Inside-EO is a room. "A fancy room with lots of interesting people in it. [list of people]".

To say list of people:
	say “The intelligent ones: [list of people who appear intelligent][line break]”;
	say “The well-build ones: [list of people who appear well-build][line break]”;
	say “The stricked ones: [list of people who appear stricked][line break]”;
	say “The educated ones: [list of people who appear educated][line break]”;
	say “The loyal ones: [list of people who appear loyal][line break]”;
	say “The self-controled ones: [list of people who appear self-controled][line break]”;
	say “The devoted ones: [list of people who appear devoted][line break]”;
	say “The sincere ones: [list of people who appear sincere][line break]”.

Will try that. Thanks, will come back to you on this possible solution.

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Looks like it is working perfectly thanks.

I will continue on my quest and if I come across some difficulty can I call upon you again?

Just to mention I started with Inform just yesterday.

So, I am a brand-new newbie with little bit of Unity c# experience, but I like text-based games and found Inform to be the one to use.

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The purpose of the “looking” action is to give a description of the room and everything in it. When you write an “instead of looking” rule, you’re telling the game what to do, well, instead of looking—that is, instead of giving a description of the room and its contents.

If you want something to happen after printing the description, you can use an “after looking” rule. Or, as Olaf suggested, you can just embed this information into the room description.

Another option is to use a “rule for writing a paragraph about” the people, but that’s a more complicated technique.

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Thanks for the advice. Will definitely try it out.

Of course! I’m glad I could help and I’m happy to do so again if I can. However, there are many here who have more experience and deeper insight than me…

Have fun with your first Inform project! If you are looking for feedback and beta testers, you will probably find both here: Beta Testing Requests and Discussion - The Interactive Fiction Community Forum

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Thanks, appreciate

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I have another problem I cannot find an answer to.
I created a room called Planning Section Table
In the room I placed objects (people) Ex. The Planning Section Chief is in the Planning Section Table (the room)
I placed about six of these objects (people) that are part of this table (room).

Now when you run the story these objects (people) show up under “You can see…”

I want to interact with these objects (people) but do not want to see their names listed under “You can see…”

Is there a solution to hide their names but still interact with them?

Looks like I found a solution:

I only use the rule “It is undescribed.”

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You can also make things scenery. Scenery objects are not described outside of your description. They are also not takable.

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I didn’t know you could set people as scenery in Inform and I really wonder that you can. :grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes:

But that is also quite practical, for example, to solve it like this:
An extra is a kind of person. An extra is always scenery.

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I’d be wary of setting a character as scenery, since it can lead to some weird results – for example, PUSH FRED gives you the output “He is fixed in place” rather than the typical “Fred might not like that.” You’re better off saying they’re undescribed, if all you want is to keep them from showing up in the regular location description.

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isn’t undescribed deprecated? and possibly opting out of some other rules? I feel that I’ve been warned off of it, though I can’t find the post. Maybe I’m making it up.

perhaps this is an alternative. Someone correct me if this is a bad road.

room1 is a room.
bob is a person in room1.
After choosing notable locale objects when the location is room1:
set the locale priority of bob to 0.

No, but the docs refer to it being “intended to be used only as a last resort”. The warnings against resorting to I6 inclusions are more dire than that.

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