How vexing!

Here’s some code for Frankenstein’s Ghost. It works – sort of.

Check jumping when player is in Cemetery and monster is in Cemetery: say "You make a desparate leap for the rope swing, and the enraged monster blindly follows, falling into the open gravesite. You kick your heels and let go of the rope, landing on your feet in the graveyard."; now monster is in Bottom of the Grave; now player is in Cemetery.

It places the player in the cemetery, where he ought to be. It places the monster in the bottom of the grave, where he ought to be.
What it doesn’t do is print the message, and dingle-darn if I know why.

What if you turned it into plain old “Check jumping” and moved the “when…” conditions into an “if” under “Check jumping”? Like

Check jumping: if the player is in Cemetery and the monster is in Cemetery: say "You make a desparate leap for the rope swing, and the enraged monster blindly follows, falling into the open gravesite. You kick your heels and let go of the rope, landing on your feet in the graveyard."; now monster is in Bottom of the Grave; now player is in Cemetery.

This is coming from the highly educated and logical logic of “if it doesn’t work, make it look more like the prototype and hope it works now”.

This is the sort of thing which (imo) should be in an Instead rule, not a Check rule. Check (as the name suggests) is usually for the basic behavior of an action, whereas Instead is meant to override the standard behavior under specific circumstances.

Thanks, Draconis, I will try that.

A good general tip here is to run the game and then type “Rules” (at the command prompt) before the rule that’s producing the vexing output. That’ll let you know whether the rule that you’re actually running is running.

In this case, I wouldn’t be surprised if you’ve got another rule to do much of the same stuff that’s cutting off this rule before it gets a chance to run.

(A nice similar debugging command is “Actions,” which will let you know which actions it’s trying to perform.)

I’ve already used Actions. Now I’ll try Rules. Thanks.