Direction somehow inherited thing property

  1. I established a binary (either/or) property pertaining to things: reachable/unreachable.*
  2. I specified that things are usually reachable.
  3. I created an Instead rule targeting “doing something other than examining when the noun is unreachable”, with a response that repeats back [the noun]

…and now I can’t go outside anymore. I get the response from the Instead rule in #3, with “outside” out-put as the noun in the response.

>out
You can’t reach the outside from down here.

I have not touched the going action in any way whatsoever. I have not done anything special with directions. The showme for “outside” just says

>showme outside
outside - direction
scenery; singular-named, improper-named
opposite: inside
printed name: “outside”
printed plural name: “directions”
indefinite article: “the”
list grouping key: none

Has anyone got a clue why “outside”, a direction, is being treated as though it has the non-default thing-property “unreachable”, even though it clearly is not a thing and does not have the “unreachable” property?

*I know there’s an example implementation of something like this in the documentation, but it’s not how I want it to work for my usage; that’s why I’m clumsily reinventing the wheel

even though it clearly is not a thing and does not have the “unreachable” property ?

For directions, “X is reachable” is false and “X is not reachable” is true. This is what you expect. Then “X is unreachable” is interpreted exactly the same as “X is not reachable”, and thus is also true.

I admit this isn’t entirely intuitive, but the opposite wouldn’t be either.

You could avoid the problem by writing

Instead of doing something other than examining when the noun is an unreachable thing:
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